About


North American Agricultural Journalists is a professional, international group of agricultural editors and writers with a membership spanning the United States and Canada. Formerly the Newspaper Farm Editors of America, and then the National Association of Agricultural Journalists, it was organized in 1952 to promote the highest ideals of journalism and agricultural coverage.

Eligible for membership are journalists in North America who report or edit agricultural news for newspapers, magazines, wires and syndicated services and are independent of agricultural organizations and businesses. Members who retire or resign from their journalism positions may become associate members. Students interested in a career in agricultural writing also are encouraged to join.

NAAJ prides itself on being self-sufficient, accepting no help from outside businesses or individuals at its meetings. The organization holds its annual meeting in Washington D.C. in April where winners of its writing contest are announced. Also presented are five special awards: the J.S. Russell Award; Glenn Cunningham Agricultural Journalist of the Year Award; Bill Zipf President’s Award; the Audrey Mackiewicz Special Award; and, the Bruce Ingersoll Mentorship Award.

The organization occasionally holds other meetings throughout the continent.

Annual dues are $75 ($15 for students) with members. For more information about NAAJ, contact:

Kathleen Phillips, executive secretary/treasurer
6434 Hurta Lane
Bryan, Texas 77808
Phone: (979) 845-2872
Fax: (979) 862-1202
ka-phillips@tamu.edu

North American Agricultural Journalists - Upcoming Events :
2017 NAAJ Writing Contest

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NAAJ 2017 Annual Meeting – Save the Date!

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2016 NAAJ WRITING CONTEST

North American Agricultural Journalists - Award Spotlight

2015 Writing Contest Winners

The awards for 2015 articles were presented April 25, 2016 at the National Press Club in Washington, D.C. NEWS Judged by George Edmonson, a retired newspaper reporter and editor. Among the papers still in business where he worked... More...